Richard Carr crowned Class 1 Champion

Today on Richard Carr’s powerboat website, we look back into the archives of Richard’s powerboat career focusing on an article written about one of his best achievements in the sport.

About Richard Carr

Richard Carr is one of the UK’s most experienced and successful powerboat racers, who has competed in the sport globally.

He has won numerous domestic and international honours: he became British Class 1 Champion in 1991; he was the winner of the coveted Needles Trophy and he also came second in the Cowes Torquay Cowes race in 1992. It was the year the race was controversially competed in the fog and it has been argued for many years that he actually won the race.

He is known in the sport for his aggressive racing character in rough seas and recently raced in the USA for Geico in 2011.

Carr is top of the class

That was the headline written about Poole based Carr’s exploits in the British National Class One Championship, which had earned him the title along with co-driver Peter Currington.

As Throttleman of his 40ft catamaran Cougar Lamborghini, Carr scooped the award after picking up the most points in national class one races during 1991.

Carr and Currington received trophies from the Royal Yachting Association (RYA) along with crystal tankards. The presentation was made by the chairman of the RYA Mr Francis Elkin at the Earls Court Boat Show.

Carr aiming for bigger and better

Ahead of the presentation, Carr revealed details of his redesigned class one boat, which he believed would dominate the upcoming season.

Following the success of both Carr and British compatriot Steve Curtis, Britain’s hopes of breaking the Italian dominance in the sport were greater than ever.

Carr’s redesigned Catamaran had been design-built by Cougar Marine of Hamble and its controversial new design offered Carr and Currington the ability to conquer both rough and calm conditions because of the boats’ extraordinarily deep tunnel.

A revolutionary design, it was hoped it would give the boat, powered by four valve per cylinder V12 engines, sea keeping qualities that are more akin to a monohull than a catamaran.